Category Archives: Writing

Best Laid Plans

Taos Toolbox is still two months away but already I’m thinking of making my packing list. (Yes, I’m serious.) I wanted to know more about what to expect, so I searched for blogs by previous attendees. I was very glad to find a post by Amy Sundberg about her experience at the workshop. I contacted her with questions for some specific details and she was very helpful. (She’s a member of both Codex and SFWA, and her blog is really quite good.)

While I have a better idea of what to expect, I still haven’t decided how to get there. I haven’t found an enormous advantage, yet, in the question of drive-vs-fly. So far both options are equal in terms of cost, hassle, and time. Reaching a get-away-from-it-all destination requires, perhaps obviously, getting away from it all…literally.

 

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Filed under Conferences, Writing

A Little Room in History

While I describe myself primarily as a speculative fiction writer, I do occasionally write historical fiction (or spec-fic with historic elements) and also have an academic background in historic architecture and in the settlement of the American West. When it comes to writing about the past, it’s key to stop (a lot more often than you’d expect, really) and ask yourself “how did they do x back then?” or “did x exist in that decade?” Continue reading

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Trust & Treachery Pre-order

For fans of intrigue, my story “Listener” is included in the “Trust and Treachery” anthology which is due out this July. It’s available for pre-order. While I have stories already out in two other collections (“Out of Time” and “In a Land Far Away”), this one was actually my first official fiction sale. It’s a large collection, so publication has taken a couple of years since my piece was accepted. In the meantime, I’m working on submissions for the next two anthologies planned by the Minnows Literary Guild and am also working on my manuscript for the Taos Toolbox workshop this summer.

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Moving Day

Moving day has come and gone – at last. The house went on the market back in November. I was so excited, I started packing then. We had a new house picked out, and I dreamed of it for four months while I gradually packed up an entire household’s worth of items. Unpacking happened in just under three weeks, and the new house is a writer’s dream: an oasis of relative quiet after years spent in a bustling neighborhood on a busy street.

In lieu of putting up routine blog posts, I’ve been working on a manuscript for Taos Toolbox and submitting short stories thither and yon. “Trust and Treachery” is scheduled to be out next month and should make an appearance at Balticon. Alas, I won’t be able to make it to the convention but am excited that the anthology will soon be available. My story in it, “Listener,” is one my better pieces (if I do say so myself).

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Filed under Random Thoughts, Writing

The Power of Paper

I was listening to an older episode of Adventures in Sci-Fi Publishing and ran across an interview with Neil Gaiman. He noted the difficulty of writing when one’s computer offers so many avenues for distraction (from the internet to spider solitaire). He suggested switching the internet off or writing for a while with pen and paper.

Pen and paper. Continue reading

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Filed under Writing, Writing Process

Tales of Good Fortune

At the start of December I sent an application to the novel-writing workshop Taos Toolbox. A few days before Christmas, I found out that I’d been accepted. Despite the lack of exclamation points thus far, I’m extremely excited. I’m really pleased I got in, and owe a debt of thanks to my critique group (the Minnows), who worked really hard to make sure my application and writing sample were up to par. Continue reading

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Coffee money well-spent

I fell in love with science fiction my freshman year of college. And storytelling not long after that. I’d become a last-minute fan of Star Trek: TNG just a half season before it ended. About six months after that, I saw Stargate and, for reasons that weren’t clear to me then, I kept going back to see it. Something drew me a dozen more times to see it before it left the theater. I was an undergrad. The only way I could afford a baker’s dozen viewings was to save my measly funds meant for vending-machine coffee and hit the cheaper midnight showings. I went back again and again, mesmerized by something a fellow student criticized as a “predictable flick with stock characters.” I assumed by predictable, she meant that the good guys won, and by stock characters, she meant villains and heroes. Continue reading

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